“Passengers” by David Colodney, 2019 Poetry Spring Contest Winner

So, mister, you ever make out on a city bus in the driving rain? I did ONCE, at 17, riding home from high school, kissing a friend of my sister who told my sister she liked me. Eyes like ravens, bubblicious chewing gum-glossed lips, she got off at my stop, lived a block over. Two … Continue reading “Passengers” by David Colodney, 2019 Poetry Spring Contest Winner

“Meet Steven” by Chris Jansen, 2019 Non-Fiction Spring Contest Winner

When the lunch bell rings we gather again, a clot of disheveled junkies in the artery of the hallway. A couple of new zombie faces have appeared, including the living-dead doctor and a girl named Melanie who wears the ubiquitous sweatpants and, instead of flip-flops, dirty pink Dearfoam slippers. She’s young and skanky-cute, like she … Continue reading “Meet Steven” by Chris Jansen, 2019 Non-Fiction Spring Contest Winner

“Lady Azalea” by Stephanie Joyce, winner of the 2018-2019 Winter Fiction Contest

            Pete wrestled the wooden stepladder into the azalea thicket. Like him it was old. Unlike him it was getting heavier every year. Ducking, sidling, backtracking the ladder like a dance partner through the thrust and wallop of the branches, he headed for the spot he'd chosen. Right between the two oldest azaleas. He had … Continue reading “Lady Azalea” by Stephanie Joyce, winner of the 2018-2019 Winter Fiction Contest

“Gender Side Effects and Stars” by Alison Terjek, 2019 Poetry Winter Contest Winner

Beware the nagging possibility of perpetual violence etched in shadows of evening trees!               - the Mother in my head I. If I could step out of gender push the weighty glove of caution away from mouth I’d startle every scarecrow leave no frosted corn field or rocky outcrop … Continue reading “Gender Side Effects and Stars” by Alison Terjek, 2019 Poetry Winter Contest Winner

“Laws of Motion” by Lena Crown, 2019 Non-Fiction Winter Contest Winner

Every object persists in its state of rest or uniform motion in a straight line unless it is compelled to change that state by forces impressed upon it. Jaxon was stranded all the way across town when he called me at three-thirty on that Thursday in November. He rushed through the introduction – “Heyineedafavor.” I … Continue reading “Laws of Motion” by Lena Crown, 2019 Non-Fiction Winter Contest Winner